The Crossroads Analysis activities are adapted from the 1995 essays created during a curriculum development venture in Niskayuna, NY. These essays are part of the greater collection of K-12 history curriculum documents created with the help of FIRST (Fund for the Improvement and Reform of Schools and Teaching) from the U.S. Department of Education. I have adapted the format of the essays with minor adaptations to content in order to target thematic learning objectives and historical analysis skills in the new College Board framework for APUSH. The MAGPIES acronym is used to help students learn and apply the themes emphasized in APUSH.

I am editing/adapting these essays as I go, so this collection is also a work in progress.  Please forgive spelling and grammatical errors, and as always feedback is welcome.


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FFAPUSH

Crossroads source: A K-16 American History Curriculum, Troy, NY: Council for Citizenship Education, Russell Sage College, 1995 and have been adapted by Rebecca Richardson using the 2015 College Board A.P. U.S. History Framework (along with other sources cited within the documents). They are shared for educational purposes.

Crossroads Analysis Activities

Mrs.Richardson's

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I incorporate these into each unit as additional readings and bonus activities. Participation rates are high, because they are easy to read, do not take a lot of time to complete (unlike reading guides which typically take 60-90 minutes each), and provide extra points on quizzes. Insight gained from thoughtfully completing the activity is evident on essays; however, some students will "do" them without any beneficial processing.

Dare to learn... and process... instead of do... and complete.
Or, perhaps Yoda said it best,
"Do or do not. There is not try."